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Unfinished Running Animation by Padder Unfinished Running Animation by Padder
Not much here.
It's rough handmade animation I did on paper to
test what framerate or timing was best to make it look
slightly choppy like japanese animation. This plus actual work
helped in determining the timing.

The way I worked afterthis is now more about how many frames I need to make an animation, and AFTERWARDS I decide how long those frames should be exposed. Plus, japanese animation seems to work the opposite way of american animation in terms of timing (for TV at least). Anyways....

This here's just an unfinished animation of a cartoonish, shrunken version of my sudent demo animation's main character: JOE. He was supposed to run, sidestep an incoming lazer beam, then run towards us. I ended up being busier than I expected, so I left out most of this and just cut to the basics to get an idea for timing. This version uses a more
common North American timing of 12 images per second (meaning each drawing is exposed twice on a timing of 24fps).
It doesn't work too well with slower timing because there are too many drawings for that. Plus it's a run. Anything with action doesn't work too well with a lower frame rate.
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:iconrauzer:
Rauzer Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2010
Pretty solid....keep it up!
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:iconinkthinker:
Inkthinker Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
NTSC framerate is 30fps (29.97) no matter what. So far as I've ever noticed, most Japanese animation uses the same basic techniques that Hanna-Barbera developed in the 60's to lower the costs of production.

The way I think of it, the framerate is always 30fps. Now I can decide how long to hold the frames, but anything longer than a 4-frame hold is going to be noticeably choppy, and not in a good way. I usually just stick to a 2-frame average with a mix of ones and threes as needed.
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:iconpadder:
Padder Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2009  Professional General Artist
Right. But in many cases animation is based on a 24 fps standard and then reconverted for NTSC, like real life movies. It's also way easier to calculate for animators. Anyways, that's the way they thought me at school.
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:iconinkthinker:
Inkthinker Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
I've got partners who swear by 24 and the 3/2 pulldown, but I don't see it (doesn't mean they're wrong, though). I feel a framerate should match the goal, and a conversion from 24 to 30 after production is just another way to potentially mess up carefully crafted timing. Then again, I've had my timing messed with by post-editors and producers too often, so perhaps I'm just bitter. :D

I'm not sure how 24 is easier to calculate than 30... seems the same to me. Either way, you get really good at fractional thinking. Really, more than 24 or 30 I tend to break things down to groups of five and seven and three, regardless of framerate. That's the area where you'll spend most of your time anyhow, if you're drawing frames... down at the level of individual actions, more than meta-planning for overall timing.
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:iconpadder:
Padder Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2009  Professional General Artist
I guess it's the way Disney and their films were, of course, 24fps that somewhat set that timing which most of the industry seemed to follow then. I didn't know people hand-animated based on 10s. Cool to know. I should try it out (in fact, with Photoshop, I'm pretty much doing that I guess).
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:iconinkthinker:
Inkthinker Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
I hear people talking about HD video that runs at 60fps, which is all fine and dandy if you shoot on video or produce through CG, but it's gonna be a little rough on us drawing types.

But yah, for now I just set my framerate at 30fps because that's NTSC native. Then I work in twos, with ones and threes when needed.
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:iconrongs1234:
rongs1234 Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2009
looks awesome so far
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:iconzatransis:
Zatransis Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
Looks great! Good energy.

M!
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:iconpadder:
Padder Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2009  Professional General Artist
thanks!
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:iconblkhorse:
blkhorse Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2009
Wow! That's looking pretty good.
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:iconpadder:
Padder Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2009  Professional General Artist
thank you : )
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:iconsquirrelsquid:
Squirrelsquid Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2009  Professional General Artist
looking good! nice motion. :3
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April 28, 2009
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